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20130117
20130125
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
boot on foreign-policy. bradley shear worker rights in the workplace. >> as secretary i have no greater priority responsibility. as i have said many times, i take responsibility. nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to be the state department -- to leave the state department safer and more secure. it meant moving quickly to respond to the immediate crisis, but also to further protect our people in high threat areas across the region and the world. host: we will get your reaction this morning to hillary clinton's testimony yesterday. we do expect misses clinton on capitol hill again today as john kerry has his hearing to replace her. for the first 45 minutes, we will get your reaction to the testimony. what's being written and on television. this is your chance to weigh in on what happened yesterday. democ here is the front page of "the washington times." the headline says "tears and rage on benghazi." we begin with an exchange between the secretary and senator ron johnson. [video clip]journal > >> do you agree that a simple phone call -- that was a piece of in
's foreign policy position. he sailed he wouldn't pick him as secretary of state because they have a very different philosophy, bill. bill: we'll see if she mentions some of the more fiery hot spots on the globe today, she's been traveling a million miles, isn't that what she said yesterday. >> reporter: we heard a lot about her traveling more than a million miles as secretary of state. those of who who like hillary clinton were applauding her for her service and her going all over the world and others wanted to ask tough questions about benghazi. martha: i see elizabeth war warren at the table there. is she playing a roam? we are seeing new faces in the senate. >> reporter: i think she has an introduction here. do you want to listen in. martha: sure. >> i know will continue in the tradition of john quincy adams and christian herder as great secretaries from the commonwealth of massachusetts. although john learned more about diplomacy overseas and in the senate he'll be the first to tell you that massachusetts is a great teacher of diplomatic skills. whether it was negotiating his way to
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
.s. foreign policy? we get some answers. >> brown: then, two military stories. we get the latest on defense secretary leon panetta's decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat. >> ifill: and we explore the pros and cons of drone warfare and examine the technology behind it-- the subject of tonight's edition of "nova." >> our mind tries to put it in rms of robot or human? but the reality is a mix. >> brown: we close with politics and a look at the way forward for the republican party, beginning with today's house vote to extend the nation's debt limit for three months. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: secretary of state hillary clinton testified for the first time today about last september's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. her testimony befor
administration's foreign policy and i urge his sped deacon firm mags. >> before leaving, just like her first day on the job four years ago -- >> i am absolutely honored and thrilled beyond words to be here with you. >> clinton is likely to say good-bye to the diplomat she's led and deliver a major speech on international policy. but her last days as america's high-flying top diplomat have been overshadowed by nearly a month of illness, the fallout over the deadly attack in benghazi. >> i think it's inexcusable that you did not know about this and that you did not read these cables. >> and her impassioned defense. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened. >> i don't think it will be part of her legacy. >> beyond benghazi, former secretary of state madeleine albright says clinton did something big for america's foreign policy. >> i think she will be valued greatly for finding other parts than just military power for america the way that we use our influence. >> others, while praising clinton personally, charge the administration she's part of, failed
woods, a co-director of foreign policy in focus at the institute for policy studies. welcome to "democracy now!" let's start off with the hostage situation in algeria. what do you understand at this point? >> first, i think we have to extend condolences to those families of those to a lost life. situation is fluid. hostages reportedly have been taken coming from at least eight different countries, including britain, japan, ireland. there are still reports that not only those that have been killed coming potentially from britain, france, japan and other countries, but also this is a crisis that is still under way. the algerian military is still seeing this as an ongoing incident. the information is scant t and fluid, changing very rapidly. it is coming out very slowly because of -- remember, algeria is essentially a military state. information is not flowing freely. there is a reluctance to share information with international actors, particularly former colonial powers, given the history of what has happened in algeria. >> the reports are coming out initially saying many of t
in africa, and the challenges for u.s foreign policy. the attack on the u.s. consulate we're joined by former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns who served in republican and democratic administrations, he's now with the kennedy school of government and harvard university. and danielle pletka, vice president for foreign and defense studies at the american enterprise institute. with you and start with benghazi. was there more light shed today. where do things stand in terms of understanding what happened and the response to it? >> well, jeffrey, i thought it was a commanding performance by secretary clinton. she was well informed. she was a master of the detail, and all the-- and she took responsibility, which was the right thing to do. she said that she will implement all the 29 recommendations of the accountability review board. now, i think the republicans there obviously had a right-- and i think they had an obligation to ask tough questions because this was a disaster for the american foreign service to lose four people in one day, including ambassador chris stevens. but i must say jus
fiscal cliff discussion, the economy is going to get zooming, we're going to -- foreign policy. >> it could end up being in foreign policy, drawing down troops, transitioning to this new kind of fighting force with the drone warfare, sort of in keeping with what we're alluding to eisenhower had. >> i think we're going to watch too very different but equally fascinating dramas play out. inside washington, the republicans still have the votes to stop the president on many things. they still control the house. they still have operational gridlock in the senate, if you will, even though democrats picked up. inside washington, the president has a challenge. but if you look at this, groundbreaking on gaye rights, back to climate change, gun control, immigration. and who that appeals to, as jack just said. they have made a doubling down of what they did in the campaign. they believe they have the coalition of the future -- young people, latinos, african-americans, and they believe the republican coalition is aging, in decline, and fractured. so they think politically they have the jui
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)